ANZ Journal of Surgery

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Table of Contents for ANZ Journal of Surgery. List of articles from both the latest and EarlyView issues.
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Unusual presentation of calcific tendinitis of the iliopsoas tendon in a 28‐year‐old female

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E398-E399, September 2019.

Beaded appendix

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E400-E401, September 2019.

Torsion of low‐grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasm

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E402-E403, September 2019.

Successful conservative management of an intramural gastric abscess: a case report

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E383-E384, September 2019.

Rare cases of hidradenitis suppurativa (Verneuil's disease) of perineum and perianal region

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page 1169-1170, September 2019.

Delayed diagnosis of spontaneous rupture of a congenital bladder diverticulum as a rare cause of an acute abdomen

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E385-E387, September 2019.

Importance of timing in staging head and neck cancer: cervical adenopathy post‐tonsillectomy mimicking malignancy

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page 1167-1169, September 2019.

Are you the perfect surgical assistant?

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page 999-1000, September 2019.

Metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma to the occipito‐cervical junction: a unique case and literature review

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E414-E416, September 2019.

Jejunal angiosarcoma: a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding with successful resection after enteroscopic localization

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E408-E409, September 2019.

Case of the missing metastatic melanoma?

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E410-E411, September 2019.

Median nerve schwannoma

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page 1158-1159, September 2019.

Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of liver in an adult with spontaneous rupture and tumour thrombus in the right atrium

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E396-E397, September 2019.

Ectopic liver attached to a chronically inflamed gallbladder: a rare and surgically challenging combination

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E388-E389, September 2019.

Gangrenous giant Meckel's diverticulitis masquerading acute appendicitis: a surgical conundrum

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E379-E380, September 2019.

Prostate‐specific membrane antigen avidity on positron emission tomography scan in malignant pleural mesothelioma

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E406-E407, September 2019.

Microsurgical reconstruction using the middle temporal vein: a case report

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page E420-E421, September 2019.

Issue information ‐ TOC

September 15, 2019 - 00:39
ANZ Journal of Surgery, Volume 89, Issue 9, Page 986-989, September 2019.

Association between higher ambient temperature and orthopaedic infection rates: a systematic review and meta‐analysis

September 15, 2019 - 00:39

A growing body of evidence has identified surges in post‐operative infection rates following orthopaedic surgery during higher temperature periods. We conducted a meta‐analysis on this topic which included 6,620 cases and 9,035 controls from 12 studies. The pooled OR indicated an overall increased odds of post‐operative infection for patients undergoing orthopaedic procedures during warmer periods (pooled OR: 1.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.04–1.30).


Introduction

Many infectious diseases display seasonal variation corresponding with particular conditions. In orthopaedics a growing body of evidence has identified surges in post‐operative infection rates during higher temperature periods. The aim of this research was to collate and synthesize the current literature on this topic.

Methods

A systematic review and meta‐analysis was performed using five databases (PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science and Central (Cochrane)). Study quality was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation method. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated from monthly infection rates and a pooled OR was generated using the DerSimonian and Lairds method. A protocol for this review was registered with the National Institute for Health Research International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (CRD42017081871).

Results

Eighteen studies analysing over 19 000 cases of orthopaedic related infection met inclusion criteria. Data on 6620 cases and 9035 controls from 12 studies were included for meta‐analysis. The pooled OR indicated an overall increased odds of post‐operative infection for patients undergoing orthopaedic procedures during warmer periods of the year (pooled OR 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.04–1.30).

Conclusion

A small but significantly increased odds of post‐operative infection may exist for orthopaedic patients who undergo procedures during higher temperature periods. It is hypothesized that this effect is geographically dependent and confounded by meteorological factors, local cultural variables and hospital staffing cycles.

Femoral side‐only revision options for the Birmingham resurfacing arthroplasty

September 15, 2019 - 00:39

Investigation of compatible dual mobility femoral stems to be used with the stable acetabular component of a Birmingham hip resurfacing system in the context of revision where only the femoral component has failed. This is based on appropriate sizing generating satisfactory clearance (the contact distance between the femoral head and acetabular shell that allows functional lubrication). Such compatibility would mean avoidance of acetabular shell revision and considerably less operative burden.


Background

The Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) system (Smith and Nephew) was developed as an alternative to conventional total joint replacement for younger, more active patients. Among other complications exists the risk for femoral component failure. The only marketed revision option for such a complication involves exchange of all components for a total replacement arthroplasty. This presents as a considerable and potentially unnecessary operative burden where revision of only the femoral prosthesis would suffice. We have analysed revision options for BHR in the context of periprosthetic femoral fractures with a stable acetabular component.

Methods

Technical details of dual mobility hip systems available in Australia were collated and analysed to assess for potential ‘off label’ use with an existing BHR acetabular component. These data were then compared with the custom‐made Smith and Nephew dual mobility implant with respect to clearance and sizing.

Results

Two dual mobility articulation modalities from two companies were identified as appropriate for potential usage with four products analysed in detail. These two demonstrated acceptable sizing and clearance measurements.

Conclusion

Comparison between readily available dual mobility prostheses with custom‐made implants showed off label dual mobility prosthetic use to be a viable alternative for femoral‐only revisions with in situ BHR. Single component revision has several advantages which include: a less complex surgical procedure, shorter operative time, decreased blood loss and the expectation of resultant lower morbidity. Furthermore, this less complex revision surgery should give comparable results to that of primary total hip arthroplasty.